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Will future events in the world allow attempts to turn the US around and restore the damage Obama is doing?
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...while the US is sending more troops to Afghanistan to fight Taliban terror, it is forcing Israel to acquiesce to PLO terrorists - Wilder
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I hear that Obama has promised to print a $100 million for Haiti. Or is it borrowed money? How generous?!
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The Haiti disaster has given Obama another opportunity to say: "I have instructed MY Admin..."
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January 05, 2010
 
More Destruction of Houses in Neguhot -- Preparing to Rebuild For the Third Time

Dear Friends,

Sunday night, January 4th, at 1 a.m., police and Yassam forces entered the community of Neguhot in the southern Hevron hills, and, like thieves in the night, went to the "Beit Hakerem" hill and ordered the Ben-David family to get dressed, and leave their home into the night cold. Once again, bulldozers destroyed their house, rebuilt only a month and a half after their original, beautiful home was destroyed. Two other homes, built nearby in solidarity with the Ben-David's, were also destroyed. Again, the families' household goods were scattered along the hilltop. The houses themselves, constructed of fiberboard panels, were turned into a muddy conglomerate.

Yehudit Ben David called us early in the morning. This is what she told us:<BR> "At around 1:00 in the morning we heard loud knocks on the door. "Police, open the door!!" they shouted. We opened the door and saw the troops outside. "We came to destroy your house. Get dressed and get out". Then they cut off the electricity and the entire house was in the dark".Yehudit and her husband told the police that their six children were sleeping and they needed some time to get organized and wake up the children, etc. The policeman said: "I must come in and see if you are not lying and really have children sleeping here". The policeman came in with a flashlight and confirmed that there indeed were six children sleeping there, aged one year old to 12 year old. "Get them up and get out" he told the parents. Yehudit said: "but there is no light. You cut off the electricity. We can't see a thing. Can I at least get one of your flashlights? Each and every one of your policemen have flashlights- give us one". The policeman refused.

"Somehow we managed to get the kids up" says Yehudit. "Meanwhile Arabs who had been employed by the police , entered our house and started taking out our possessions, simply throwing everything outside, on the muddy floor - the fridge, the matresses, the linens, the books, the clothes..." After that the bulldozer came and destroyed our house and an additional two that belong to our neighbors.

"Luckily, on the nearby hill that is also part of Neguhot, where some ten families live, there was an empty caravan, and we temporarily moved in there, till we can rebuild our house on the "Bet Hakerem" hill, for the third time. "The problem is", said Yehudit ben David, that now the "Beit Hakerem hill" is empty and Arabs who come by foot from their village, kilometers away, approach the hill and steal our belongings. They grab whatever they can and walk back to their village far away.We must find a way of priotecting the hill. align=flush> Women in Green immediately organized a group of young men to stand guard at the hill and together we drove out to Neguhot. The scene of the destruction was heartbreaking. Just a few days ago we had come there to protest the fact that Arabs had thrown a molotov cocktail against a bus, wounding an 18 year old girl. Instead of trying to catch the Arab terrorists, Israeli security forces were busy planning the destruction of the Ben David house.

Through the ugly stratagems of Defense Minister Barak and the deafening silence of Prime Minister Netanyahu, the power of the state continues to be mobilized against "enemies of the state" like the Ben-David's and their neighbors, whose "crime" is their desire to make their homes in the Land of Israel generally, and within the legal boundaries of their community of Neguhot specifically. They built their homes in a designated new neighborhood of Neguhot to prevent Arab squatters from expropriating their community's land, as is happening throughout the Negev and the Galil along with Judea and Samaria.

The spirit of these families won't be broken: they are ready to rebuild their houses anew. We, secure for now in our nice, warm homes, have to do our own mobilizing -- of ourselves -- to provide them with the resources to rebuild their homes for the third time. align=flush> We call on all lovers of the Land of Israel to contribute to the Yibane Fund, currently being established by Women In Green for building and settlement in the hills of Judea.

While organizing the launching of this fund, the destruction in Neguhot gave us an object lesson of the fund's purpose and necessity.

We can rebuild the houses destroyed in Neguhot within 10 to 14 days if we can collect the funding. It will take 100,000 NIS (some $30,000) to construct three new very basic structures.

The struggle over the future of the Land of Israel is being waged on the hilltops of Judea and Samaria.

We, with God's help and with your help, will ignore all anti-Zionist and anti-Jewish decrees and continue to build our Biblical homeland.


Please send your checks to:

"Women For Israel's Tomorrow (Women in Green)- The Yibane Fund"
P.O. Box 7352 Jerusalem 91072 Israel

For US tax deduction please contact us by email at nmatar@netvision.net.il

For details: Nadia Matar 050-5500834,Yehudit Katsover 050-7161818,  or Miriam Fleishman 052-4295557.

Link to Arutz 7 article in which you can see pictures of the Ben Davids first beautiful house, the bulldozer destroying that house and pictures of the simple houses rebuilt after the first destruction. The pictures are at the end of the Hebrew article. http://www.inn.co.il/News/News.aspx/198660

With love for Israel,

Nadia Matar and Yehudit Katzover

Leave a comment
 
January 05, 2010
 
More Destruction of Houses in Neguhot -- Preparing to Rebuild For the Third Time

Dear Friends,

Sunday night, January 4th, at 1 a.m., police and Yassam forces entered the community of Neguhot in the southern Hevron hills, and, like thieves in the night, went to the "Beit Hakerem" hill and ordered the Ben-David family to get dressed, and leave their home into the night cold. Once again, bulldozers destroyed their house, rebuilt only a month and a half after their original, beautiful home was destroyed. Two other homes, built nearby in solidarity with the Ben-David's, were also destroyed. Again, the families' household goods were scattered along the hilltop. The houses themselves, constructed of fiberboard panels, were turned into a muddy conglomerate.

Yehudit Ben David called us early in the morning. This is what she told us:<BR> "At around 1:00 in the morning we heard loud knocks on the door. "Police, open the door!!" they shouted. We opened the door and saw the troops outside. "We came to destroy your house. Get dressed and get out". Then they cut off the electricity and the entire house was in the dark".Yehudit and her husband told the police that their six children were sleeping and they needed some time to get organized and wake up the children, etc. The policeman said: "I must come in and see if you are not lying and really have children sleeping here". The policeman came in with a flashlight and confirmed that there indeed were six children sleeping there, aged one year old to 12 year old. "Get them up and get out" he told the parents. Yehudit said: "but there is no light. You cut off the electricity. We can't see a thing. Can I at least get one of your flashlights? Each and every one of your policemen have flashlights- give us one". The policeman refused.

"Somehow we managed to get the kids up" says Yehudit. "Meanwhile Arabs who had been employed by the police , entered our house and started taking out our possessions, simply throwing everything outside, on the muddy floor - the fridge, the matresses, the linens, the books, the clothes..." After that the bulldozer came and destroyed our house and an additional two that belong to our neighbors.

"Luckily, on the nearby hill that is also part of Neguhot, where some ten families live, there was an empty caravan, and we temporarily moved in there, till we can rebuild our house on the "Bet Hakerem" hill, for the third time. "The problem is", said Yehudit ben David, that now the "Beit Hakerem hill" is empty and Arabs who come by foot from their village, kilometers away, approach the hill and steal our belongings. They grab whatever they can and walk back to their village far away.We must find a way of priotecting the hill. align=flush> Women in Green immediately organized a group of young men to stand guard at the hill and together we drove out to Neguhot. The scene of the destruction was heartbreaking. Just a few days ago we had come there to protest the fact that Arabs had thrown a molotov cocktail against a bus, wounding an 18 year old girl. Instead of trying to catch the Arab terrorists, Israeli security forces were busy planning the destruction of the Ben David house.

Through the ugly stratagems of Defense Minister Barak and the deafening silence of Prime Minister Netanyahu, the power of the state continues to be mobilized against "enemies of the state" like the Ben-David's and their neighbors, whose "crime" is their desire to make their homes in the Land of Israel generally, and within the legal boundaries of their community of Neguhot specifically. They built their homes in a designated new neighborhood of Neguhot to prevent Arab squatters from expropriating their community's land, as is happening throughout the Negev and the Galil along with Judea and Samaria.

The spirit of these families won't be broken: they are ready to rebuild their houses anew. We, secure for now in our nice, warm homes, have to do our own mobilizing -- of ourselves -- to provide them with the resources to rebuild their homes for the third time. align=flush> We call on all lovers of the Land of Israel to contribute to the Yibane Fund, currently being established by Women In Green for building and settlement in the hills of Judea.

While organizing the launching of this fund, the destruction in Neguhot gave us an object lesson of the fund's purpose and necessity.

We can rebuild the houses destroyed in Neguhot within 10 to 14 days if we can collect the funding. It will take 100,000 NIS (some $30,000) to construct three new very basic structures.

The struggle over the future of the Land of Israel is being waged on the hilltops of Judea and Samaria.

We, with God's help and with your help, will ignore all anti-Zionist and anti-Jewish decrees and continue to build our Biblical homeland.


Please send your checks to:

"Women For Israel's Tomorrow (Women in Green)- The Yibane Fund"
P.O. Box 7352 Jerusalem 91072 Israel

For US tax deduction please contact us by email at nmatar@netvision.net.il

For details: Nadia Matar 050-5500834,Yehudit Katsover 050-7161818,  or Miriam Fleishman 052-4295557.

Link to Arutz 7 article in which you can see pictures of the Ben Davids first beautiful house, the bulldozer destroying that house and pictures of the simple houses rebuilt after the first destruction. The pictures are at the end of the Hebrew article. http://www.inn.co.il/News/News.aspx/198660

With love for Israel,

Nadia Matar and Yehudit Katzover

Leave a comment
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100102023213AANbIjb

Should we follow Israel's air safety record and conduct strict passenger profiling based on religion and race?

  • 3 days ago
Of course everybody is checked
The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has named El Al the winner of the Operational Safety Audit program (IOSA), for the second year in a row

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CAROLINE GLICK CAROLINE GLICK

Dec 31, 2009 21:07 | Updated Jan 3, 2010 20:04
jpost.com
Column One: A low and dishonest decade
By CAROLINE GLICK

Upon returning from Cairo on Tuesday, Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu proclaimed, "It's time to move the peace process forward."

The most sympathetic interpretation of Netanyahu's proclamation is that he was engaging in political theater. It was a low and dishonest statement uttered at the end of what has been, in the immortal words of W.H. Auden, "a low and dishonest decade."

Everyone with eyes in their heads knows that there is no chance of making peace with the Palestinians. First of all, the most Israel is willing to give is less than what the Palestinians are willing to accept.

But beyond that, Gaza is controlled by Hamas, and Hamas is controlled by Iran.

For its part, Fatah is not in a position to make peace even if its leaders wished to. Mahmoud Abbas and his deputies know that just as Hamas won the 2006 elections in Judea, Samaria and Gaza, Hamas would win elections today. To maintain even a smudge of domestic legitimacy, Fatah's leaders have no choice but to adopt Hamas's rejection of peaceful coexistence with the Jewish state.

Clearly, now is not the time "to move the peace process forward."

No less than what it tells us about Netanyahu, his statement is notable for what it tells us about Israel. Our continued willingness to ensnare ourselves in the rhetoric of peace processes demonstrates how little we have progressed in the past decade.

In 1999, Netanyahu was ejected from office by an electorate convinced that he was squandering an historic opportunity for peace between Israel and its neighbors. A majority of Israelis believed that Netanyahu's signature policies of demanding that the Palestinians abide by their commitments to Israel, and maintaining the IDF's security zone in south Lebanon were dooming all hope for peace.

His successor, Ehud Barak, promised to remove IDF troops from Lebanon and forge a final peace with the Palestinians and with Syria within a year. After winning the election, Barak famously promised a swooning crowd at Rabin Square that the "dawn of a new day has arrived."

Barak lost no time fulfilling his campaign promises. He withdrew the IDF from south Lebanon in May 2000.

He launched talks with Syria in December 1999. For four months he begged Syrian dictator Hafez Assad to accept the Golan Heights, stopping only after Assad harshly rebuffed him in March 2000.

And in July 2000 at Camp David, Barak offered Yasser Arafat Gaza, 90 percent of Judea and Samaria and half of Jerusalem in exchange for peace. After Arafat rejected his offer, Barak sweetened it at Taba in September 2000, adding another 5% of Judea and Samaria, the Temple Mount, and extra lands in the Negev, only to be rejected, again.

Barak made these offers as the wisdom of appeasement exploded before his eyes. Hizbullah seized the withdrawal from Lebanon as a strategic victory. Far from disappearing as Barak and his deputy Yossi Beilin had promised it would, Hizbullah took over south Lebanon and used the area as a springboard for its eventual takeover of the Lebanese government. So, too, with its forces perched on the border, Hizbullah built up its Iranian-commanded forces, preparing for the next round of war.

Similarly, Barak's desperate entreaties to Assad enhanced the dictator's standing in the Arab world, to the detriment of Egypt and Jordan.

To the extent he required encouragement, the ascendance of Hizbullah, Syria and Iran made it politically advantageous for Arafat to reject peace. Buoyed by their rise, Arafat diverted billions of dollars in Western aid from development projects to the swelling ranks of his terror armies. Instead of preparing his people for peace, he trained them for war.

Arafat responded to Barak's beggary at Camp David and Taba by launching the largest terror offensive Israel experienced since the 1950s. The Palestinians' orgiastic celebration of the mass murder of Israelis was the final nail in Barak's premiership, and it seemed at the time, the death-knell of his policies of appeasement.

A year and a half after he took office, the public threw Barak from power. Likud leader Ariel Sharon - who just a decade earlier had been taken for dead - was swept into power with an electoral landslide. To the extent the public vote was for Sharon, rather than against Barak, the expectation was that Sharon would end Barak's appeasement policies and defeat Arafat and the terror state he had built in Gaza, Judea and Samaria.

But this was not to be.

Rather than abandon Barak's policies, Sharon embraced them. He formed a unity government with Labor and refused to fight. He didn't fight after 22 teenagers were massacred outside the Dolphinarium nightclub in June 2001. He did not fight after the September 11, 2001, attacks and the Palestinian celebrations of the slaughter in New York and Washington.

Sharon did not order the IDF to fight until the carnage of March 2002 that culminated in the Seder massacre at Netanya's Park Hotel forced his hand. Had he not ordered the IDF to dismantle the Palestinian terror infrastructures in Judea and Samaria at that time, he faced the sure prospect of being routed in the Likud leadership race scheduled for November of that year.

Operation Defensive Shield was a textbook example of what you get when you mix weak politicians with a strong society. On the one hand, during Defensive Shield, the IDF took control of all the major towns and cities in Judea and Samaria and so enabled Israel to dismantle Palestinian terror networks by remaining in place in the years that followed.

On the other hand, Sharon refused to allow the IDF to launch a parallel operation in Gaza, despite repeated entreaties by the army and residents of the South. Most important, Sharon barred the IDF from toppling the PA or even acknowledging that it was an enemy government. And he maintained that the Palestinian jihad began and ended with Arafat, thus absolving all of Arafat's deputies - who were then and today remain deeply involved in the terror machine - of all responsibility.

In acting as he did, Sharon's signaled that he was not abandoning appeasement. Indeed, he made clear that his aim was to re-embrace appeasement as his national strategy as soon as it was politically feasible.

Most Israelis explained away Sharon's behavior in his first term as the price he was forced to pay for his coalition government with Labor. So when in 2003 Sharon, Likud and the political Right won an overwhelming mandate from the public to lead the country without the Left, the expectation was that he would finally let loose. He would finally fight for victory.

Instead, Sharon spat on his party, his coalition partners and his voters and adopted as his own the policies of the Left that he had condemned in his campaign.

To implement those policies, Sharon dismantled his government and his party and formed a coalition with the same Left the nation had just overwhelmingly rejected.

The past decade's major policies: the withdrawal from Gaza, the construction of the security fence, the acceptance of the road map peace plan, the Annapolis Conference, Operation Defensive Shield, the Second Lebanon War and Operation Cast Lead all shared one central feature. They were all predicated on ignoring the lessons of the failure of appeasement in 2000.

Whereas Defensive Shield's strategic success was owed to Israel's decision to maintain control over the territory the IDF seized in the fighting, in launching the wars with Hizbullah and Hamas, Sharon's successor, Ehud Olmert, ignored that success and chose instead to emulate the operation's failures.

To further his government's appeasement policies, Olmert refused to order the IDF to seize south Lebanon or Gaza. By the same token, like Sharon in Defensive Shield, Olmert announced at the outset that he had no interest in defeating Israel's enemies. He limited the goals of the campaigns to "teaching them a lesson." And of course by not seeking victory for Israel, Olmert enabled both Hizbullah and Hamas to claim victory for themselves.

By opting not to defeat Hizbullah or Hamas, Olmert communicated the message that like Sharon before him, his ultimate strategic aim was to maintain the political viability of appeasement as a national strategy. He was fighting to protect appeasement, not Israel.

As we move into the second decade of this century, we need to understand how the last decade was so squandered. How is it possible that in 2010 Israel continues to embrace policies that have failed it - violently and continuously for so many years? Why, in 2010 are we still ignoring the lessons of 2000 and all that we have learned since then?

There are two main causes for this failure: The local media and Sharon. Throughout the 1990s, the Israeli media - print, radio and television - were the chief propagandists for appeasement. When appeasement failed in 2000, Israel's media elites circled the wagons. They refused to admit they had been wrong.

Misleading phrases like "cycle of

violence" were introduced into our newspeak. The absence of a security fence - rather than the presence of an enemy society on the outskirts of Israel's population centers - was blamed for the terror that claimed the lives of over a thousand Israelis. Palestinian propagandists and terrorists such as Fatah leader Marwan Barghouti were treated like legitimate politicians. Palestinian ties to Iran, Syria, Iraq and the nexus of global jihad went unmentioned or uncommented upon.

At the same time, opponents of appeasement - those who had warned of the dangers of the Oslo process and had spoken out against the withdrawal from Lebanon and a potential withdrawal from the Golan Height and Gaza - were not congratulated for their wisdom. They remained marginalized and demonized.

This situation prevails still today. The same media that brought us these catastrophes now derides Likud ministers and Knesset members who speak out against delusion-based policies, while suddenly embracing Netanyahu who - with Barak at his side - has belatedly embraced their pipe dreams of appeasement-based peace.

Then there is Sharon. The man who built the settlements, who removed the PLO from Lebanon, who opposed Oslo, Camp David and the withdrawal from Lebanon; the man who opposed the security fence and pledged to remain forever in Gush Katif. As Israel's leader for most of the past decade, more than anyone else Sharon is responsible for Israel's continued adherence to the dishonest, discredited and dishonorable dictates of appeasement.

Whether due to his alleged corruption, his physical enfeeblement, his fear of the State Department, or his long-held and ardent desire to be accepted by the Left, Sharon betrayed his voters and his party and he undermined Israel's ability to move beyond failure.

Auden's "low and dishonest decade" was the 1930s. It was the West's obsession then with appeasement that set the world on course for the cataclysm of World War II.

As Israel enters the new decade, we must redouble our efforts to forestall a repeat of the cataclysm of the 1940s. Disturbingly, Netanyahu's call for a fraudulent peace process shows that we are off to an ignoble, untruthful start.

caroline@carolineglick.com

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Elbit's Viper robot, capable of crawling through tunnels, entering buildings, turning around and broadcasting images.

With self-detonating grenades, thinking bullets and robot warriors, humans on the frontline could soon be a thing of the past. When armies clash in the not-too-distant future, remotely-operated robotic weapons will fight the enemy on land, in the air and at sea, without a human soldier anywhere on the battlefield.

The first robotic systems are already being used by the Israel Defense Forces and other armies across the world, and only budgetary constraints seem to be keeping science fiction from becoming reality.

In places where there is no choice but to send in troops, constantly improving broadband technologies, developed from the civilian communications industry, will serve as an essential part of the infrastructure for all modern military forces.
 
A helicopter that spots suspicious movement on the ground will, for instance, be able to relay a command to a drone aircraft to photograph the site and transmit the picture in real time to troops on the ground and to the command posts in the rear.

Soldiers will be able to mark their target by its coordinates and with lasers, allowing missiles launched from dozens of kilometers away to be guided by global positioning systems, ensuring accuracy and destruction of the target.

The systems will be coded to prevent enemy interception of the operation. Spy satellites that today weigh several tons will be shrunk down to anything between one and 100 kilograms or less, with engines the size of postage stamps. Infantry rifles will be computerized and fire "smart" rounds telling them when and where to explode. New rockets will also be able to think by themselves to enhance their accuracy.

Israel's military industries, already world leaders in arms technology, are hard at work developing weaponry for the 2020s. Development of new weapons for the IDF is generally carried out with assistance and in cooordination with the Defense Ministry?s research and development arm.

The Israeli military's demands are the cornerstone of the local weapons industry, and they can be summed up in two words: miniaturization and accuracy. The former will enable the troops in the field to carry their weapons or communications equipment more easily, and the latter will help avoid civilian casualties.

Military censorship prevents disclosure of the Israeli arms industries? most exciting and futuristic devices, but a good picture of what can be expected can be compiled using what is already in the public domain.

Pin-point accuracy

"The Protector, which we are already marketing, is a vessel that sails all over in all kinds of places without a living soul on board," says Roni Postman, vice president for R&D at Rafael Advanced Defense Systems. "It can get close up to a terrorists' boat, address it through a loudspeaker, and open fire at it. In the past, a thing like this required a boat with seven or eight crewmen who were in constant danger. This type of remote control is one of the clearest characteristics of the future battlefield. It will be a battlefield devoid of troops, with vehicles doing what soldiers have done until now."

Unmanned boats, land vehicles and aircraft will be either controlled remotely or will function autonomously, pre-programmed to carry out a mission from start to finish, such as reaching an enemy bunker, transmitting a photograph back to a command post, launching a projectile at it, and returning, or blowing itself up to destroy the target and the people inside it.

Another characteristic of weapons now undergoing development is pin-point accuracy for urban warfare, especially in a world that has become less accepting of "collateral damage."

"Whereas up to a decade ago, planes would drop bombs that destroy everything within a 20 or 30-meter radius without any restraints in order to hit a certain target, that's all over today," Postman says. "We are working on capabilities that will make it possible to place a missile launched 70 kilometers away through a specific window of a certain house. It is also a question of costs. Armies will pay a lot for a missile only if they are sure that it will hit the target head-on."

On top of these requirements, the weapons of the future will also be more efficient in terms of the ordnance delivered to the target. No longer will the same bomb or missile be used to deal with a man on a bike and a three-story building.

Forces will be equipped with what they need to deal with certain objectives and not simply with "the lowest common denominator," says Postman.

On the other hand, Rafael is also developing cross-platform systems for armies looking to cut down on costs. For example, one goal is a missile that can be fired from a helicopter, a fixed-wing plane, a boat, or a land vehicle and that can destroy tanks and above-ground structures and bunkers.

"The miniaturization trend that has taken hold of the civilian market enables the introduction into military systems of things we couldn't even dream of before, because of their size, weight and volume," says Postman. "This is a worldwide tendency and future battlefields will be full of weapons and other items that are much smaller than they have been until now. For example, something that is today a square meter will be reduced to five square centimeters. This is especially useful in unmanned air vehicles, whose weight-carrying capacity is limited by the size of their engines, the amount of fuel they must carry and the altitudes they have to attain. Every gram counts. If they are loaded down with heavy systems, they won't be able to carry out their missions."

Israel Aerospace Industries, for example, has developed the Mosquito, a UAV with a 40-centimeter wingspan and a silent engine, that can be launched from the shoulder of a single soldier. Even this device may be shrunken down, if the military so requires.

Micro-satellites and nanotechnology

The future battlefield will also include outer space. GPS-based technology fed by satellites are already becoming a fundamental element in future military systems. Moreover, the ability to equip satellites with IAI-produced radar that sees through clouds will enable every field commander to obtain, in daylight and at night and in any weather conditions, a picture of his target.

Moreover, space-based weapons, or satellites, will also serve as a component in projects for the destruction of long-range missiles from distant enemies facing Israel, such as Iran. And when satellites become a critical means in military operations, defending them becomes just as critical, making space wars a realistic development.

Israel is one of seven members of the club of countries that have proved their independent ability to put satellites into orbit, alongside the United States, Russia, India, China, Japan and Western Europe - which has a unified space program based on French capabilities. Iran has recently also demonstrated a preliminary capability to launch satellites.

Israel's satellites are all manufactured by IAI, and include optical observation and radar platforms as well as communications satellites. IAI engineers are working on technologies for future satellites, ranging from construction materials to advanced designs that will enable, for example, the deployment of antennae with a radius of dozens of meters in space.

Such antennae could lead to a revolution in advanced satellite communications.

At the same time, IAI is working on developing integrated systems of up to 10 smaller satellites that will upgrade inter-satellite communications and the data picked up by land stations.

"Within this group, technology-wise, we are second only to the United States, and in certain niches we are even number one, especially in mini-observation satellites," says Isaac Ben-Israel, chairman of the Israel Space Agency, referring to an observation satellite developed by IAI and Rafael, which also serves espionage purposes and weighs 300 kilograms. The American counterpart weighs three or four tons.

The need to reduce the size of the satellite sprang from the fact that unlike other countries which launch their orbiters eastward and can therefore take advantage of the speed of the earth's spin, Israel launches westward for regional security reasons, against the direction of the earth's rotation. As a result, the Israeli launches lose a great deal of energy.

The solution was to reduce the size of the satellite and all of its component parts, its engine and photographic instruments.

"Our miniaturization capability comes from the security requirements," says Ben-Israel. "It was strengthened after the signing of the peace treaty with Egypt, because ironically it was then that we found ourselves unable to send planes on aerial photography missions into Sinai to check out the deployment of forces there."

Launching a 250-kilogram satellite costs an estimated $75 million, while the satellite itself costs $100-200 million, depending on its payload.

They last for six or seven years in space. The evolving threats require ongoing technological upgrades.

"We want to go down to satellites that weigh less than 100 kilograms," says Ben-Israel. "That way, the launch obstacle will be removed. Today, to launch a satellite at the appropriate speed an expensive rocket is required. If it were possible to launch it from a jet fighter aircraft, for example, it would be a much easier proposition. It would be possible to put satellites in orbit for much less money and at any time. It is beginning to become feasible in these very days."

The next generation of satellites, now being developed, will weigh ten kilograms (micro-satellites) or one kilogram (nano-satellites) and some speak of even lighter ones. They will orbit at an altitude of 500 kilometers above the surface of the earth. Ben-Israel says one way of sending up a 100-kilogram orbiter without losing any of its operational capability is to break it into 10 units each weighing 10 kilograms.

But technology must be developed that will be enable each part to migrate to the correct place after launch, after which they will continue to orbit together as a cluster.

"That's the direction being taken," says Ben-Israel. "That way, each part can be shot from a plane separately and even at different times, and in this manner build the satellite in space over a week."

Rafael's Postman believes that a satellite weighing less than 100 kilograms will cost eight to 10 times less than a large orbiter. "Because it will cost less, it will be possible to put a formation of 10 satellites into space, and to time their orbits in such a way that it will be possible to maintain an unbroken 24-hour watch over the enemy," he says.

The main problem with micro-satellites is that their shelf life in space is shorter than larger ones, by approximately one or two years. However, because of the relatively lower costs, he believes, this will be the direction taken by many states seeking to avail themselves of observation satellites.

"I believe that Israel will bring these good tidings to the world, because it requires miniaturization of communications and electrical propulsion that not every country is capable of."

Small wonders from a small country

Even without any miniaturization, Israel possesses unique technologies that can upgrade future satellites. Elbit Systems is working on an advanced optical system that will be able to transmit multicolored pictures and that will be able to function at night. In addition, IAI radar will improve the resolution of the pictures. Today, satellite pictures can be found on the open market with a resolution of 70 centimeters.

Israel already has technologies for satellite photography at higher resolutions, and they are expected to yet improve. The achievements of Israeli space technologies are reflected in both the MSAR (mini-synthetic aperture radar) project of the U.S. space agency NASA and the French Venus project.

"MSAR is a mission undertaken by NASA in order to map the surface of the planet Venus, to see if it will be possible to land there in the future," explains Ben-Israel.

Venus is surrounded by clouds of toxic gases and the project requires synthetic aperture radar which can take photographs through fog, dust and darkness. There are seven countries capable of developing synthetic aperture radar systems and one of them is Israel, through ELTA, a subsidiary of IAI. Israel's miniaturization capabilities were also helpful in this project.

American satellite radar weighs four tons, and the Venus satellite has to be relatively light, so NASA put out a tender for bids that was won by IAI over aeronautical giants like Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman.

NASA is now weighing whether to launch satellites to Venus or Mars or other planets, as it can?t afford to do them all simultaneously.

"If the mission to Venus is the one that is budgeted, in five years we'll be seeing the first photographs of that planet from a satellite which will apparently be constructed entirely in Israel, because of our unique miniaturization abilities," says Ben-Israel, adding that the Northrop Grumman will be the marketer of the project.

The soldier of the future

What will the next war look like? Will it be waged on land, tank against tank, like previous wars? Will it be waged against terrorist organizations? Or against the threat of long, medium and short-range missiles?

"From the point of view of Elbit Systems, life is complex and a response must be found for Iran, for terrorists in Gaza and also for Syria," says Haim Rousso, vice president for technological and engineering excellence at Elbit. "Intelligence will always be necessary, in both peace and wartime, so we at Elbit are constantly working on developments in the sphere, from satellites to tactical systems on the ground."

He says that the systems are evolving in the direction of giving real time information, with analysis and application capability, making it possible to respond immediately.

To cope with the challenges emanating from Iran, Syria and Lebanon, Elbit is working on perfecting its multispectral camera, Rousso says.

"In the security world what they look for is camouflaged targets; they want to be able to distinguish between what is real and what only looks like a target, to find things that are buried under the ground," he says. "So we do not ask what the eye can see, but rather what is the color or the combination of colors that is being sought. The great challenge is to build a camera with a reasonable size and price tag that can be carried on an uncomplicated platform and which we can tell precisely which colors to find - first color A, then color B. Another challenge is to build a bank of targets, to understand what we are interested in, and what is the spectral signature of the target. This involves research, collection and construction of databases, because colors change in different weather conditions, for instance. This camera will be able to see things that no other instrument today can see. We expect this to be a key element of the future battlefield."

The defense establishment's demand for products that are light, small and not too expensive is a function of the nature of land warfare, which will continue to keep military forces occupied for years. It will require miniaturization in optics, electronics and power supply.

"We want to give every soldier the capability to identify targets and other objects, and to communicate with the whole world, and when such large quantities of equipment are involved, the price becomes a significant element," says Rousso. "Everyone in the world - the United States, Europe, Australia - is busy working on the soldier of the future. In the war on terror, a low-intensity conflict, the individual soldier is given a great deal of weight. He needs the means of talking to the system, to get a picture and to transmit data. Technologically speaking, each soldier is a sensor and a platform."

Rousso says nanotechnology is on its way.

"It was not developed for the military but the anticipated evolution of the next decade could cause a revolution. That's why we are studying the technology and its military applications. Also of interest to us are the mini-robots that can get into tunnels or buildings and move around mapping the interior and transmitting pictures. It already exists, but in the long term it will be honed and use of it will increase. Elbit has developed the Viper robot, and we are already speaking of a family of smaller robots. In the sphere of unmanned aircraft we are also talking about ongoing upgrades in the construction materials, the aerodynamics, the ability to stay longer in the air at higher altitudes and better maneuverability."

In addition to their UAVs, both Elbit and Rafael have developed sea-faring drones, and Elbit and IAI have developed unmanned land vehicles that carry out pre-programmed missions, as distinct from remotely-controlled robots.

The goal is to give the vehicles a degree of artificial intelligence that will enable them to react like human drivers in cases where they encounter unanticipated obstacles on the way, such as large puddles of water. These vehicles will also possess an attack capability.

"It will apparently take many years before these things are actually built," says Rousso. "But today we already have intelligent systems that know how to identify dangers and to think what has to be done to cope with them. An investment in the technology of artificial intelligence, in computerized vision and accurate navigation is required."

The threat from afar

IAI is currently aiming to give soldiers on the ground capabilities that are today available only to the air force, says the company's vice president for R&D, Dan Peretz, adding that IAI has moved over from producing traditional weaponry to advanced comprehensive systems.

GPS is being used for the first time, through miniaturization, for the next generation of smart rockets, making them more accurate.

"Accuracy is no longer a function of range. The same degree of accuracy can be had at 250 kilometers as at 10 kilometers." says Peretz. "And when I have an accurate system, I don't need a large warhead anymore, because I hit the target right on the nail. There are already some accurate missiles, but they are expensive. The introduction of GPS into warfare has already begun in the United States in the sphere known as Guided Multiple Launch Rocket Systems. It enables forces under fire to return fire without calling in air support, as the Americans did in Iraq."

The Tzayad (Hebrew for "hunter") system in use in the Israeli army, developed by Elbit, enables a commander in the field today equipped with a handheld computer to get a picture from a UAV and to call in helicopter fire. The new IAI system will be able to mark the target's coordinates, making it possible to hit it from the rear with smart rockets.

The system included GPS-guided or laser-homing rockets.

"I put a laser dot on a target, and a laser sensor in the rocket head can home in on it," says Peretz. "There are systems today that work on laser detectors - the smart, accurate missiles. Now there will also be laser-guided rockets."

Lev Tahor ("pure heart") is a smart mortar shell. It carries a GPS computer and can do what until now only missiles could do, but it is 10 times smaller.

"We are the first in the world who have taken a laser detector system to rockets, the first in the world to fire mortar shells that are guided by GPS," says Peretz. "We are developing the ability to hit targets with the first shell, without hitting the wrong target."

Peretz says IAI is collaborating with the American company Raytheon to sell the systems to the U.S. military, with the first demonstrations due in 2010.

"In five years' time, this technology will be taken for granted," he says.

Another development that miniaturization has made possible is Refaim ("ghost") which involves fitting a tank's fire-control system onto a rifle, enabling it to gauge the range of a target and to order the projectile that it fires to explode where it will do the most damage.

For example, a grenade could be told to explode at a point above enemy personnel hiding behind a wall.

"The Refaim system will include a 40mm round that contains a computer and I can command to explode in the air at a certain range, to explode on contact, or to explode after contact. If I want to shoot into a room, I would tell it to explode three meters after going through the window, in order to kill the people inside. It can also self-destruct, so as not to leave dangerous explosives on the ground if it doesn?t hit its target."

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu often mentions the threat facing Israel from afar, or the "third circle" of enemies not inside or bordering Israel, like Iran.

The IAI is continuing to develop unmanned aircraft and is going on to new tasks defined for it by the defense establishment, including handling the third circle.

Moreover, the unique radar that penetrates fog and dust will be miniaturized in the future so that it will have more applications and be more accurate and able to identify the sources of fire within the first and second circles, in all weather conditions.

Sources in the defense establishment say that the IAI is directing much of its resources to address the threats of the third circle, first and foremost an advanced Arrow system for the accurate interception of long-range missiles. The Arrow will leave the Earth's atmosphere and enter outer space, employing innovative technologies to locate its target and destroy it.

In facing far-reaching enemies, the defense establishment must develop lightweight and accurate ordnance that can be carried by small aircraft or on the American F-35 jets now under development, which has outstanding stealth properties but is relatively small.

The Israel Navy is not being left out of planning for the future, and its vessels are to be equipped with a new anti-aircraft missile system that IAI is developing in collaboration with India, integrated with advanced radar and fire control systems. Submarines will also have a key role in future wars, and they will be equipped with technology enabling them to stay underwater for longer periods and with new attack capabilities.

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The truth and nothing but the truth

From: Jerry Golden,  report@thegoldenreport.net  December 31, 2009 

Sometimes there is no reason to say a lot, just state some simple facts. I've taken the liberty of putting a couple of things together that Ann C. and Batya L. sent me to make that point.

 

 

"I THINK IT IS REMARKABLE THAT THE PRESS CAN LOCATE EVERY WOMAN WITH WHOM TIGER WOODS HAS HAD AN AFFAIR IN THE LAST FEW YEARS. ALONG WITH PHOTOS, TEXT MESSAGES, RECORDED PHONE CALLS, ETC.  THEY NOT ONLY REVEAL THE CAUSE OF THE  FAMILY FEUD, BUT THEY EVEN KNOW IT WAS A WEDGE CLUB FROM HIS GOLF BAG THAT HIS WIFE USED TO BREAK IN THE WINDOWS OF THE ESCALADE.  NOT ONLY THAT, THEY CLAIM TO KNOW EXACTLY WHICH NUMBER WEDGE IT WAS!!!

 

THIS IS THE SAME PRESS (OR IS IT?) THAT CANNOT LOCATE OBAMA'S BIRTH CERTIFICATE ... 

OR ANY OF HIS PAPERS WHILE IN COLLEGE."  

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